Charlie Hebdo caricatures Recep Erdogan; sparks Turkish fury

WION Web Team Paris, France Oct 28, 2020, 07.10 AM(IST)

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and French President Emmanuel Macron Photograph:( Agencies )

Story highlights

Charlie Hebdo's intervention came during an escalating war of words between Erdogan, Macron, and other European leaders after the beheading of French schoolteacher Samuel Paty by a suspected Islamist attacker this month

French satirical magazine Charle Hebdo has caricatured Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan over a front-page cartoon for its latest edition that mocking him for his attacks on the country.

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It comes after Erdogan questioned the mental health of French President Emmanuel Macron for treating "millions of members from different 

Also read: After Imran Khan, Recep Erdogan doubles down in backlash against Macron's Islam comments

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The front-page caricature of Wednesday's edition of Charlie Hebdo, released online on Tuesday night, shows Erdogan in a t-shirt and underpants, drinking a can of beer and lifting up the skirt of a woman wearing a hijab to reveal her naked bottom.

"Ooh, the prophet!" the character says in a speech bubble, while the title proclaims "Erdogan: in private, he's very funny".

"We condemn this most disgusting effort by this publication to spread its cultural racism and hatred," Erdogan's top press aide, Fahrettin Altun, tweeted. 

"French President Macron's anti-Muslim agenda is bearing fruit! Charlie Hebdo just published a series of so-called cartoons full of despicable images purportedly of our President."

Charlie Hebdo's intervention came during an escalating war of words between Erdogan, Macron, and other European leaders after the beheading of French schoolteacher Samuel Paty by a suspected Islamist attacker this month.

Some of the weekly's previous work lampooning the prophet was shown by Paty in a class on free speech, leading to an online campaign against him and the grisly murder before the start of school holidays on October 16.

An attack on Charlie Hebdo by jihadists in 2015 left 12 people dead, including some of its most famed cartoonists. 

Relations between Macron and Erdogan have become increasingly strained over geopolitical issues ranging from a Greek-Turkish maritime dispute to the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan. 

Macron's defence of Charlie Hebdo, and his recent comment that Islam worldwide is "in crisis", have prompted Erdogan to urge Turks to boycott French products amid a wave of anti-France protests in Muslim-majority countries.

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