Colorado state to look into Elijah McClain's case a year after his death

WION Web Team
New Delhi, Delhi, India Published: Jun 25, 2020, 07:31 AM(IST)

Taiwan Black Lives Matter protest Photograph:( Reuters )

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In August 2019, Elijah McClain was walking home at night when the  Aurora Police Department received a 911 call. The caller described the 23-year-old Elijah as a “suspicious person”.

Colorado's governor Jared Polis announced on Wednesday that the state will be looking into Elijah McClain's case, almost a year after his death that involves police and paramedics. 

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In August 2019, Elijah McClain was walking home at night when the  Aurora Police Department received a 911 call. The caller described the 23-year-old Elijah as a “suspicious person”. According to the caller, McClain was walking on Billings Street near East Colfax Avenue, wearing a ski mask and flailing his arms at the caller.

The police reported on an online blog that the officers tried to contact McClain where he began to resist. The blog read: "The male began to resist the officer contact, a struggle then ensued, and he was taken into custody." 

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"Aurora Fire Rescue administered a standard medication to reduce Mr McClain’s agitation. He was then transported to a local hospital where tragically he died days later," the blog read. 

McClain's name made rounds on social media after the death of George Floyd. His name was chanted during anti-racism protests in Colorado. A petition was brought in urging the state to investigate the matter and bring the accused to justice. This petition was signed by 2.2 million Americans. 

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On Wednesday, Governor Jared Polis took to Twitter and wrote: "I am hearing from many Coloradans who have expressed concerns with the investigation of Elijah McClain’s death. As a result, I have instructed my legal council to examine what the state can do and we are assessing next steps. Public confidence in our law enforcement process is incredibly important now more than ever. A fair and objective process free from real or perceived bias for investigating officer-involved killings is critical."

No charges have been filed yet in the case. 

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