Chemicals found in daily-use products could decrease COVID-19 vaccine's effectiveness: Reports

WION Web Team
New Delhi, Delhi, India Published: Nov 18, 2020, 01:30 PM(IST)

COVID-19 vaccine Photograph:( Reuters )

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The researchers also found out that a certain type of PFAS called perfluorobutyrate (or PFBA) can increase the risk and severity of the deadly virus

A team of scientists have recently revealed that a range of chemicals found in daily-use products could hinder the effectiveness and success of the COVID-19 vaccine.

As per some recent reports, our day-to-day commodities such as pans, pots, pizza boxes and waterproof clothing have small amounts of man-made chemicals called polyfluoroalkyl, also known as PFAS. These chemicals could negatively affect the effect of COVID-19 vaccine.

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These chemicals are man-made and have earlier also shown hints of increasing risks of liver damage, cancer and decreased fertility in human beings. Now, the scientists have discovered that there might be a possibility these chemicals could hinder the effectiveness of the vaccine that is supposed to protect the humans from one of the deadliest viruses in the world.

"At this stage we don’t know if it will impact a corona vaccination, but it’s a risk," said Philippe Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health. "We would have to cross our fingers and hope for the best."

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As per the initial research, it has been found that children who were exposed to these chemicals had reduced antibodies concentrations when they were administered with vaccines of tetanus and diphtheria. The same results were observed by another follow-up study on the matter.

The researchers also found out that a certain type of PFAS called perfluorobutyrate (or PFBA) can increase the risk and severity of the deadly virus as this chemical can accumulate in the lungs. However, the study proving the same, is yet to be peer-reviewed.

"People with high exposure to PFAS have a non-protective and very low antibody levels after four vaccinations for diphtheria and tetanus," Grandjean said. "So if a vaccine for Covid is similar, the PFAS will likely inhibit the response from a vaccine. But it is an unknown at this stage,"

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