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'What are they scared of?': UK PM Johnson challenges opposition to call confidence vote

File photo of UK PM Boris Johnson. Photograph:( Reuters )

WION Web Team New Delhi, Delhi, India Sep 25, 2019, 11.49 PM (IST)

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Wednesday challenged opposition parties to call a vote of no confidence in his government, telling them in parliament, "what are they scared of?"

As he faced MPs for the first time since the Supreme Court quashed his suspension of parliament, Johnson asked, "Will they have the courage to act?... Come on, then."

Johnson was reaction follows the Labour opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn calling on Johnson to resign while also adding that he would not call a no-confidence vote in the parliament until the possibility of a no-deal Brexit had been eliminated.

"Our first priority is to prevent a no-deal exit from the European Union on October 31," Corbyn was quoted as saying by local media.

Watch: Trouble follows Boris Johnson, wherever he goes!

Reacting on Supreme Court's ruling, Johnson said the top court was "wrong" to get involved in "what is essentially a political question at a time of great national controversy".

The court's judgement has challenged Johnson's authority, prompting calls for his resignation and casting further doubt on his promise to pull Britain out of the European Union on October 31.

The ruling throws Johnson's Brexit planning into disarray - coming after a series of defeats in the parliament that have curbed his plans for Brexit even if there is no divorce deal with Brussels.

The Prime Minister is likely to also renew his call for an early election to end the stand-off with parliament, having said in New York on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly on Tuesday that it was "the obvious thing to do".

Story highlights

As he faced MPs for the first time since the Supreme Court quashed his suspension of parliament, Johnson asked, 'Will they have the courage to act?... Come on, then.'