New species of carnivorous dinosaur with short arms discovered in Argentina, say scientists

WION Web Team
Buenos Aires Updated: Feb 26, 2022, 03:04 PM(IST)

A new species of carnivorous dinosaur, which used to have short hands, has been discovered. Photograph:( Reuters )

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The dinosaur's skull, which is called Guemesia ochoai, was found in the Los Blanquitos Formation in Salta province. The research has been published in ‘Vertebrate Paleontology’ journal

Numerous secrets are waiting to be unearthed in the world. Well, literally as a new species of carnivorous dinosaur, which used to have short hands, has been discovered by scientists in northern Argentina.  

The experts have found the skull base of the species assumed to be a relative of the abelisaurids.  

The new development provides further information about the inhabitants of South America around million years ago during the Late Cretaceous.  

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The dinosaur's skull, which is called Guemesia ochoai, was found in the Los Blanquitos Formation in Salta province. The research has been published in ‘Vertebrate Paleontology’ journal.  

Federico Agnolin, lead author and paleontologist at the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) and the Argentine Museum of Natural Sciences, told Reuters, "This is a completely new species of carnivorous dinosaur. Previously, we knew practically nothing about the dinosaurs that inhabited northern Argentina."  

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"We had a great idea of what is happening in Patagonia with many findings and Brazil, but between those two territories, practically nothing is known about dinosaurs that had inhabited the Earth some 70 million years ago," Agnolin added.  

"We know that Guemesia was a carnivorous dinosaur, a relative of the abelisaurids, a group of dinosaurs that had very short arms, stout legs and walked on their hind legs," added Agnolin while examining the jaw.   

"We know that it had a very acute sense of smell and short vision based on brain reconstruction. Guemesia, like its relatives, had a very ornate and solid skull, which, for some scientists, could mean that the animal hunted its prey by ramming it with its head," Agnolin added.   

(With inputs from agencies) 

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