Ultra-conservative lawmakers’ proposal to ban pets triggers outrage in Iran

WION Web Team
Tehran Updated: Dec 12, 2021, 06:44 PM(IST)

An Iranian woman poses for a picture with her dog at a park in Tehran (file photo).  Photograph:( AFP )

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A proposal from ultraconservative lawmakers to ban pets seems to be on the minds of several citizens in Iran. It looks to ban "importing, raising, assisting in the breeding of, breeding, buying or selling, transporting, driving or walking, and keeping in the home wild, exotic, harmful and dangerous animals". The bill has been introduced last month

A proposal from ultraconservative lawmakers to ban pets seems to be on the minds of several citizens in Iran.   

According to the proposed law, the practice of humans living under one-roof with pets is a "destructive social problem".   

It looks to ban "importing, raising, assisting in the breeding of, breeding, buying or selling, transporting, driving or walking, and keeping in the home wild, exotic, harmful and dangerous animals".  

The bill has been introduced last month. The proposed law has not gone down well with animal lovers in the country.  

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The animals, which the law proposes to ban, are "crocodiles, turtles, snakes, lizards, cats, mice, rabbits, dogs and other unclean animals as well as monkeys".  

Around 75 MPs or a quarter of parliamentarians have recently signed a text entitled "Support for the rights of the population in relation to harmful and dangerous animals", said media reports.  

The authors of the proposed law say that the phenomenon could "gradually change the Iranian and Islamic way of life" by "replacing human and family relationships with feelings and emotional relationships towards animals".  

"No, my cat is not dangerous," said Iranian animal lover Mostafa, who runs a pet supplies shop on busy Eskandari Street in downtown Tehran.     

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"Crocodiles can be called dangerous, but how can rabbits, dogs and cats be dangerous?" Mostafa asked.  

Moussa Ghazanfarabadi, head, parliament's judicial commission, who signed the text, told AFP, "I agree with the project in general, but I certainly disagree with some of its clauses. It is just a bill, but whether it succeeds is another matter."   

(With inputs from agencies)  

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