Turkey to pull out from European treaty designed to protect women from femicide

WION New Delhi, Delhi, India Aug 06, 2020, 11.36 PM(IST) Edited By: Palki Sharma

Turkey Photograph:( Reuters )

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Their equivocal cry is -- women will not forgive domestic violence. And, ideally -- neither should the Turkish government. But, just weeks after the gruesome murder of Gultekin.

Pinar Gultekin was strangled, burned and dumped in a barrel. Who was the murderer? Her ex-boyfriend.

Gultekin's death sparked nationwide protests in Turkey.

In her honour -- thousands of women -- including stars -- have posted black-and-white selfies on Instagram.

Hashtag challenge accepted became a trending topic. In Istanbul, hundreds of protesters have stormed the streets.

Their equivocal cry is -- women will not forgive domestic violence. And, ideally -- neither should the Turkish government. But, just weeks after the gruesome murder of Gultekin.

The government's apathy is out in the open. Instead of working towards stricter laws to stop violence against women. Erdogan's government is planning to pull out of a European treaty designed to protect women.

"The istanbul convention is a safety to ensure that women do not suffer violence, abuse and rape. For this reason, we refuse to allow this convention to be attacked. We will continue to be on the streets."

Turkey wants to quit the accord under pressure from conservative forces. There are critics in religious bodies and politics, who believe the international charter is too liberal.

They say -- the accord guarantees more freedom to women than necessary. And, undermines traditional family values.

"They are attacking the rights that women have gained through their struggles. But we are in the streets, in the squares to defend our rights. We will never give up, our struggle will continue as it is today."

Ironically, in 2011, the council of Europe accord was signed in Istanbul. But, Turkey has failed to uphold its pledge. To eliminate domestic violence and promote equality.

Turkey does not keep official statistics on femicide.

But, activists do, last year alone, Turkey saw 474 femicides. Double the number recorded in 2011 -- the year in which the accord was signed.

The World Health Organisation data shows 38 per cent of women in Turkey face domestic violence. Compared to about 25 per cent in Europe. The pandemic has made it worse.

For many women -- the threat is the worst where they should be safest. In their own homes.