Race plays a role in severe COVID-19 illness among kids, study finds

WION Web Team Washington, DC, United States of America Aug 08, 2020, 11.10 AM(IST)

Coronavirus in children Photograph:( WION Web Team )

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The CDC reports come just days after President Donald Trump told Fox News that children are "almost immune" to the coronavirus.

Black and Hispanic children are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, according to two Centres for Disease Control and Prevention reports published on Friday.

The CDC reports come just days after President Donald Trump told Fox News that children are "almost immune" to the coronavirus.

More than 338,000 children in the United States were diagnosed with COVID-19 until July 31, representing about 8 per cent of the nearly 5 million cases reported so far in the country.

One of the CDC reports released Friday found that between March 21 and July 25, "weekly hospitalisation rates steadily increased among children." And overall, Black and Hispanic children were most likely to require hospitalisation.

About a third of those children were sick enough to be admitted into a hospital's intensive care unit.

Forty-two percent of the 208 children in the CDC analysis had at least one underlying condition, usually obesity.

It's unclear how obesity might affect the severity of COVID-19 outcomes, but the link has also been noted among adults with the virus.

The second report published Friday by the CDC looked specifically at MIS-C.

Out of 570 such cases, 364 needed to be put in intensive care. Ten young patients died, the CDC reported.

Also read | Rare syndrome linked to COVID-19 found in nearly 600 US children

As with severe COVID-19 cases, racial and ethnic disparities are common for MIS-C, as well. About 60 per cent of children with MIS-C in Massachusetts have been Black or Hispanic.

Indeed, the CDC report found that overall across the country, MIS-C tended to be more prevalent -- 73.6 per cent -- in racial minorities.