Pregnant people being turned away in Covid vaccine clinics is alarming, experts warn

WION Web Team
London, United Kingdom Published: Oct 27, 2021, 04:03 PM(IST)

Pregnant women get vaccinated Photograph:( Reuters )

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The fact that pregnant people are being turned away from Covid vaccine clinic in the UK has raised alarms as 85 per cent of Covid deaths in pregnant people have been of unvaccinated patients

Members of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) have accused that the local Covid vaccine clinics in the UK are turning away pregnant people.

Experts have asked pregnant people to get vaccinated as soon as possible to ensure their own safety as well as their baby’s wellbeing. However, members of JCVI have told local media house, the Guardian, that pregnant people are being turned away in vaccine clinics.

Also read | Covid, pregnancy, breastfeeding and vaccines: Let's help in breaking myths for new mothers

As of now, only 15 per cent of the pregnant people have been vaccinated in the UK. Experts are urging the government to focus on unvaccinated people and motivate them to get vaccinated, rather than simply concentrating on those who are willing to get vaccinated.

Experts have asked the UK government to pay special attention to unvaccinated pregnant people and urge them to get vaccinated. Unvaccinated pregnant people are more vulnerable to getting infected by the deadly coronavirus, and putting their baby’s health in danger, the experts warn.

The fact that pregnant people are being turned away from Covid vaccine clinic in the UK has raised alarms as a study by Oxford University’s MBRRACE-UK has found that at least 13 pregnant people have lost their lives to Covid in the UK between the months of July and September 2021. As per the data, nearly 85 per cent of these women were unvaccinated and had therefore become more vulnerable.

Also read | Vaccinated pregnant women tend to pass antibodies to their babies, reveals study

"Women are being turned away from clinics and now there are some trusts offering it as part of the maternity service, but it is not universal so there are still barriers," Prof Marian Knight, the lead for the MBRRACE-UK programme was quoted by the Guardian. "It is important we start to see data on outcomes in vaccinated women so we can show evidence that vaccines are safe, rather than say there’s no evidence they cause harm. These are very small numbers, but the point is that women could have been saved; children have been orphaned."

Pregnant people carry the risk of getting infected, especially in the third trimester. In addition to this, there are higher chances of premature birth and cesarean delivery, if the mother has been infected by the deadly coronavirus. Pregnant people have been advised to quickly act on symptoms such as common cold, nausea, fever, dry cough, etc.

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