Iran's Hassan Rouhani rejects new 'Trump deal'; tells US to pick 'right path'

WION Web Team New Delhi, Delhi, India Jan 15, 2020, 05.33 PM(IST)

File photo of Hassan Rouhani and Donald Trump. Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

Addressing the nation through televised speech, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani told the US to 'pick the right path' and return to 2015 nuclear deal. Trump pulled out from the deal in 2018.

Terming it a "strange offer", Iran on Wednesday rejected the proposal of new "Trump deal" by British Prime Minister to resolve the nuclear row.

On Tuesday, Boris Johnson said the Iran nuclear deal could be replaced by the "Trump deal" while praising the US President as a great deal maker.

Trump also said that he agrees with the British counterpart and should replace the Iran nuclear deal.

Addressing the nation through televised speech, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani told the US to "pick the right path" and return to 2015 nuclear deal. Trump pulled out from the deal in 2018.

"This Mr Prime Minister in London, I don't know how he thinks. He says let’s put aside the nuclear deal and put the Trump plan in action," Rouhani said.

“If you take the wrong step, it will be to your detriment. Pick the right path. The right path is to return to the nuclear deal."

Iran denies any intent to acquire nuclear weapons and says its breaches of the deal would be reversed if Washington lifts sanctions.

"All of our activities are under the supervision of the International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA),” said Rouhani.

Watch | US leadership is ignorant and arrogant, says Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif

Signed in the year 2015, between Iran and P5+1 countries (China, Russia, France, United States, Germany and the UK) in Vienna, the accord, orchestrated by the Obama administration, called for Iran to accept restraints on its nuclear programme in return for the lifting of UN, European and US nuclear-related economic sanctions. 

The tension between Iran and spiked after Trump pulled out from the deal in May last year alleging that Iran hadn't done enough to limit its weapons stockpile and had continued to work on its nuclear programme. Iran has denied any such allegations.

Since then, Tehran has gradually taken steps to reduce its compliance with the deal, which prompted Britain, France and Germany to formally accuse it on Tuesday of violating the terms.

The tension between both countries reached new low earlier this month after the US killed an Iranian general in a drone strike in Baghdad.

 Tehran responded a week ago by launching missiles at US targets in Iraq. 

(With inputs from agencies)