Hell breaks loose as Lancet describes women as 'bodies with vaginas'

WION Web Team
New York, United States Updated: Sep 29, 2021, 08:16 PM(IST)

Lancet Photograph:( Agencies )

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Readers took the liberty to point out that an article on prostate cancer, published on September 20, did not label men as 'bodies with penises', contrary to this article

It is not easy to find the rights words to describe something or someone and that tough task has led Lancet into a pool of trouble.

Lancet is a leading medical journal which has faced fury for describing women as 'bodies with vaginas'.

An article titled 'Periods on Display' was published on September 01. In this article the experts tried to examine an exhibition exploring the taboos related to menstrual cycle. It also touched upon the history of periods exhibited at the Vagina Museum in London.

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However, the article gained spotlight due to its poor choice of words, rather than the text. The article was featured on the front page on the journal and in that the term 'women' was replaced with 'bodies with vaginas'.

"Historically, the anatomy and physiology of bodies with vaginas have been neglected," the journal's front page read.

This has brought immense criticism for the journal as many experts have labelled this to be 'insulting and abusive' and others have called it a ‘misguided pursuit of woke points’.

Some people even cracked down on Lancet by calling it a hypocrite institution. Readers took the liberty to point out that an article on prostate cancer, published on September 20, did not label men as 'bodies with penises', contrary to this article.

"This framing makes it sound like a coincidence that "bodies with vaginas" have been neglected by medicine, as if it were not the product of a discrimination and oppression specific to the female sex. Medical misogyny is exists - and refusing to acknowledge women perpetuates it," Feminist writer Claire Heuchan, who blogs under the name Sister Outrider, said on Twitter.

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After this outcry, Lancet took to social media platform, Twitter, to issue an apology. "I apologise to our readers who were offended by the cover quote and the use of those same words in the review. At the same time, I want to emphasise that transgender health is an important dimension of modern health care, but one that remains neglected," said Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet.

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"Trans people regularly face stigma, discrimination, exclusion, and poor health, often experiencing difficulties accessing appropriate health care. The exhibition review from which The Lancet cover quote was taken is a compelling call to empower women, together with non-binary, trans, and intersex people who have experienced menstruation, and to address the myths and taboos that surround menstruation."

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