COVID-19 vaccine: Oxford university's phase one human trials shows encouraging trends

WION Web Team
New Delhi, Delhi, India Published: Jul 16, 2020, 06:48 PM(IST)

Coronavirus vaccine Photograph:( Reuters )

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Blood samples taken from a group of volunteers who were involved in the study showed the vaccine stimulated antibodies and 'killer T-cells'

The much-awaited COVID-19 vaccine developed by the University of Oxford has raised hopes after Phase one human trials showed some encouraging trends. 

Blood samples taken from a group of volunteers who were involved in the study showed the vaccine stimulated antibodies and "killer T-cells", the Daily Telegraph reported.

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Previous research has suggested T-cells can last in the body for years and help combat the viruses.

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However, some experts also said only further trials could give a clear picture. 

"Virtually any vaccine inevitably does this," Danny Altmann, a professor of immunology at the Imperial College London, said, reported Guardian, referring to the generation of antibodies and T-cells. 

However, Dr Zania Stamataki, a senior lecturer in viral immunology at the University of Birmingham, said though the questions remains, the findings are a "very encouraging sign". 

Some scientists have declined to comment and are waiting for the full publishing of results of the study on medical journal Lancet on Monday. 

Also, experts said if the vaccine can generate immunity, the key would be to see for how long the immunity stands.

Recent studies have suggested that patients who have COVID-19 antibodies after getting recovered from the disease saw a signifcant fall in the number of antibodies over the three-month period. 

US-based Moderna, producer of another leading COVID-19 vaccine candidate, said on Tuesday that it is all set to kick-off the final stage of human trials on July 27. 

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