Another lockdown unlikely in UK, claims scientist who imposed first restrictions

WION Web Team
London, United Kingdom Published: Aug 07, 2021, 06:55 PM(IST)

Domestic violence in times of coronavirus in London Photograph:( AFP )

Story highlights

Although concerns of Delta variant’s effect have grown, the hospitalisation rate of Covid patients has decreased significantly along with the rate of infection

UK government’s top scientific advisor has claimed that it is highly unlikely that any further lockdown will be required in the country, even with the wide spread of the Delta variant of coronavirus.

Although concerns of Delta variant’s effect have grown, the hospitalisation rate of Covid patients has decreased significantly along with the rate of infection.

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"I think it is unlikely we will need a new lockdown or even social distancing measures of the type we've had so far," said immunologist Professor Neil.

Many experts believe that the Covid infections are set to increase from the month of September as the new school and university session will begin and workers will start returning to the office.

However, scientists are hopeful that the situation can be kept under control without imposing strict lockdowns and other restrictions.

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One main reason behind this positive attitude is the progress of the vaccine programmes in the country. Experts and the government are urging locals to get vaccinated as soon as possible to make sure people can have a guard against the deadly coronavirus.

Vaccines against coronavirus have "dramatically changed the relationship between cases and hospitalisation," Ferguson said.

However, he has also warned locals to exercise caution as the danger of slipping back into the red zone is still possible. "We're at a stage where we've got a huge amount of immunity in the population, but the virus is more transmissible than it's ever been so we have this complicated trade-off," he warned.

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