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Ancient rocks can show how Earth was able to sustain life, study says

New DelhiEdited By: Sayan GhoshUpdated: Aug 01, 2022, 10:11 PM IST
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Photograph:(AFP)

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The study takes into account rocks near the centre of the earth which were experimented on with the help of carbon dioxide laser and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The goal was to find out the changes in the earth’s core over time.

A new study, published in Nature Communications, states that life on earth was only possible due to the “rejuvenation” of the planet’s core. The study also says that around 565 million years ago, the magnetic field of earth was down to almost ten percent of its strength right now and the planet was on its way to have the same fate as Mars where life has not been found till now. The magnetic field was bolstered by the phenomenon known as the Cambrian explosion or the “biological big bang”.

“The inner core is tremendously important. Right before the inner core started to grow, the magnetic field was at the point of collapse, but as soon as the inner core started to grow, the field was regenerated,” John Tarduno, corresponding author of the paper, said in a press statement.

The study takes into account rocks near the centre of the earth which were experimented on with the help of carbon dioxide laser and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The goal was to find out the changes in the earth’s core over time.

According to the study, the rocks on the outer core of the earth’s surface showed that electric currents generated by the magma present result in the magnetic field gaining strength.

“Because we constrained the inner core’s age more accurately, we could explore the fact that the present-day inner core is actually composed of two parts. Plate tectonic movements on Earth’s surface indirectly affected the inner core, and the history of these movements is imprinted deep within Earth in the inner core’s structure,” added Tarduno, in the press statement.

(With inputs from agencies)