Western diet responsible for global rise of autoimmune diseases, say researchers

WION Web Team
London Published: Jan 10, 2022, 02:18 PM(IST)

As the autoimmune diseases are rising, some researchers have found western diet to be responsible for the trend (representative image).    Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

At a time when the autoimmune diseases are rising in the world, some researchers have found western diet responsible for the trend. To get to the depth of the issue, an initiative was taken at London’s Francis Crick Institute by two experts, James Lee and Carola Vinuesa. They set up separate research groups to help find the causes of autoimmune diseases

At a time when the autoimmune diseases are rising in the world, some researchers have found western diet responsible for the trend.   

The people are suffering these diseases as their immune systems can no longer identify the difference between healthy cells and invading micro-organisms. So, the defences against the diseases that once protected them are now attacking own tissues and organs.  

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To get to the depth of the issue, an initiative was taken at London’s Francis Crick Institute by two experts, James Lee and Carola Vinuesa. They set up separate research groups to help find the causes of autoimmune diseases.  

“As Human genetics hasn’t altered over the past few decades. So, something must be changing in the outside world in a way that is increasing our predisposition to autoimmune disease,” said Lee.  

Vinuesa pointed to changes in the diet as nowadays many countries have adopted western-style diets. People are going for more fast food.   

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“Fast-food diets lack certain important ingredients, such as fibre, and evidence suggests this alteration affects a person’s microbiome – the collection of micro-organisms that we have in our gut and which play a key role in controlling various bodily functions,” Vinuesa said.   

“These changes in our microbiomes are then triggering autoimmune diseases, of which more than 100 types have now been discovered,” Vinuesa added.  

(With inputs from agencies) 

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