Only ten years to save world's biodiversity from extinction: UN

WION Web Team New Delhi, Delhi, India Jan 16, 2020, 02.07 PM(IST)

This picture taken on September 3, 2019 shows tropical dolphins swimming with Esperanza, the environmentalist organization Greenpeace's boat sailing on the Amazon reef off the French Guiana coast. Photograph:( AFP )

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1 million out of the 8 million species are already facing extinction and many others will be obliterated in the coming decade if necessary steps are not taken.

Pollution needs to be cut into half and approximately one-third of the Earth needs to be protected by 2030 to save our biodiversity according to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity.

A draft plan was released by the UN agency this week, according to which the wildlife needs to be saved from mass extinction in the coming decades.

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Similar targets were set by the convention in 2010, at a summit in Japan.

But almost all of the countries failed to meet these goals due to which they are now facing unparalleled extinction rates, the imperilled ecosystems and the deplorable condition of human survival.

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It warns that 1 million out of the 8 million species are already facing extinction and many others will be obliterated in the coming decade if necessary steps are not taken.

Biodiversity is fundamental to the well-being of human beings and is crucial for a healthy planet.

 

The purpose of the framework is 'to galvanize urgent and transformative action by governments and all of society, both global and local'.

The aim of the convention is the stabilization of the fragile biodiversity by 2030 and the recovery of ecosystems by 2050. 

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For the achievement of this target, the draft has laid 20 targets for the next decade.

One of these includes giving 'protected status' to biologically significant sites and to cover at least 30 per cent of them by 2030.

At least 10 per cent of these sites will be placed under ''strictly protected''.

Another target is to reduce pollution from plastic wastes, biocides and excess nutrients around 50 per cent.

A crucial target presented by it also includes ascertaining that the trade of every wild species is legitimate and sustainable to bring greater sustainability to the sectors of the economy and to ensure the inclusivity of indigenous communities in it.