How do galaxies arrange themselves in the universe? New study has an interesting answer

Edited By: Sayan Ghosh
New Delhi, India Updated: May 16, 2022, 06:10 PM(IST)

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Two researchers from the University of Nottingham have suggested that the smaller galaxies are creating ‘invisible walls’ out of a new class of particles called symmetrons and that is the maintaining the core structure of all the massive bodies existing in the universe.

The mysteries of the universe continue to fascinate scientists all around the world and one of the major points of contention over the years have been the placement of the galaxies all around the cosmos. While the existing theories suggest that there is no pattern when it comes to the various galaxies, a Vice report said that a new study shows that small galaxies create disk-like structures around their host galaxies which allows them to maintain a certain structure in their entirety.

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Two researchers from the University of Nottingham have suggested that the smaller galaxies are creating ‘invisible walls’ out of a new class of particles called symmetrons and that is the maintaining the core structure of all the massive bodies existing in the universe. The study is mainly based on dark matter, but no previous study suggests this kind of behaviour from any dark matter.

The study states that the smaller galaxies are reacting to the gravitational pull of the bigger galaxies and as a result, that allows them to stay in a proper orbit. However, the new observations in the study can finally answer the question of why they sometimes create unusual orbits for themselves.

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“We know that we need new particles because we have dark matter and dark energy and so we suspect that we’re going to need to add new particles to our standard model to account for those things,” Aneesh Naik, a research fellow at the University of Nottingham and an author of the study, told Vice.

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