Five foetuses found at the home of an anti-abortion activist

WION Web Team
Washington, united States Updated: Apr 01, 2022, 05:33 PM(IST)

Since the heartbeat law came into force in September last year, Texan neighbour states like Oklahoma have seen a flood of patients seeking abortions. This has led to long wait times and maxed out clinic capacities. Now, with a similar law in Oklahoma, these patients would have to go farther and farther. Photograph:( AFP )

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Recently, Ms Handy claimed to have gained an access to a foetal tissue organ bank at the University of Washington in Seattle, but the university stated that no tissue or organ were taken

Five foetuses have been discovered at a Washington residence belonging to an anti-abortion activist, police say.

Lauren Handy, 28, the leader of the Progressive Anti-Abortion Uprising (PAAU) group describes herself as a “Catholic anarchist.”

Police said that they were investigating a “potential bio-hazard material” when the foetuses were discovered, according to a report in the BBC.

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Handy was indicted separately on Wednesday for attempting to force entry into an abortion clinic in the year 2020.

On Wednesday, she was pictured outside the property as the investigators removed items from the basement in bags and coolers.

Ms Handy told local news outlet WUSA9 that “people would freak out when they heard” what was inside the containers being seized.

According to the Washington police, they could not confirm about the residence where the foetuses were found was in fact Ms Handy’s. However, two law enforcement officials told the Washington Post that the house was where Ms Handy was detained and lived or stayed there.

"There doesn't seem to be anything criminal in nature about that except for how they got into this house," Ashan Benedict, executive assistant Washington DC police chief, said at a news conference.

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Recently, Ms Handy claimed to have gained an access to a foetal tissue organ bank at the University of Washington in Seattle, but the university stated that no tissue or organ were taken.

According to a separate federal indictment released on Thursday, Ms Handy had arranged an appointment with the Washington Surgi-Clinic, an abortion provider, under the name Hazel Jenkins on October 22, 2020 claiming she wanted an abortion.

The indictment claims that when she arrived, a group “forcefully entered the clinic,” knocking over a clinic employee and also injuring her ankle.

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According to the indictment, Ms Handy and eight other members of this group are accused of conspiring to injuring, oppress, threaten and intimidate patients and staff in violation of their federal rights. They are also charged with violating the Freedom of Access to

Clinic Entrances Act (FACE) for using force to interfere with the clinic’s services.

Each one of them could face up to 11 years in prison and a fine up to $350,000 (£266,000) if convicted.

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