Fellow islander reunites woman with wedding ring lost 50 years ago after three-day search  

WION Web Team
London Published: Dec 04, 2021, 11:44 AM(IST)

An islander helped a woman get her wedding ring lost over 50 years ago after three days of search with the help of a metal detector. Photograph:( Twitter )

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An islander helped a woman get her wedding ring back, which was lost over 50 years ago, after three days of search at the location with the help of a metal detector. The woman had lost the wedding ring in a potato patch in the Western Isles. After learning about the loss during a chat, a fellow islander Donald MacPhee, who is also a metal detectorist, made it a mission to find the ring

In an inspirational story of sorts, an islander helped a woman get her wedding ring back, which was lost over 50 years ago, after three days of search at the location with the help of a metal detector.  

The woman had lost the wedding ring in a potato patch in the Western Isles. After learning about the loss during a chat, a fellow islander Donald MacPhee, who is also a metal detectorist, made it a mission to find the ring.  

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The ring had slipped off finger of Peggy MacSween, who is now 86, while gathering potatoes at her home on Benbecula in the Outer Hebrides. She thought it was lost forever but soon she was about to get the good news.  

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With the help of a metal detector, MacPhee spent three days in searching the ring at Liniclate Machair, the sandy coastal meadow where the potato patch once was.  

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MacPhee, who runs Benbecula’s Nunton House hostel, said, “For three days, I searched and dug 90 holes. The trouble is gold rings make the same sound (on the detector) as ring pulls and I got a lot of those – as well as many other things, such as horseshoes and cans. But on the third day, I found the ring.”  

“I was absolutely flabbergasted. I had searched an area of 5,000 square metres. It was a one in a 100,000 chance and certainly my best find. It was a fluke. There was technique involved, but I just got lucky,” added MacPhee.   

(With inputs from agencies) 

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