As cities fall quite amid coronavirus lockdown, birdlife rejoice in US!

WION Web Team New Delhi, Delhi, India Apr 04, 2020, 09.47 PM(IST)

File photo. Photograph:( AFP )

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According to a study published last year in the journal science, birds are disappearing at an alarming rate in the United States and Canada.

Despite the challenges of coronavirus, there is light at the end of the tunnel and birdlife is no exception.

With normal life now coming to a halt due to the pandemic, nature is rebooting itself. Amid all this, US-based conservationists are also expecting an increase in bird activity as people are off the open space.

"We've never seen anything like this and so indeed, we're learning about the very questions you're asking, namely how much does the human behaviour actually change bird behaviour? We've got citizens, scientists asking that literally all over the world," Director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, John Weaver Fitzpatrick said.

"Right now, literally because of the incredibly big changes in human behaviour right now, we have a worldwide experiment underway because we'll be getting records of birds from all over the planet, including the densest cities," the Ornithologist also said.

Thanks to the lockdowns, quarantines and social distancing measures used to battle the coronavirus outbreak, Fitzpatrick, who is part of eBird, a global database for storing bird sighting data, is expecting a spike in bird activity data.

"There are actually a number of studies, both in the US and in Europe that show that birds do respond to human anthropogenic noise by reducing their own songs, in some cases actually changing the frequency of their songs. And so it's a safe bet that in the much-reduced noise, noise sphere that they're experiencing right now, they're probably out there filling it up a little bit more than they would have otherwise," he said.

However, social distancing has not meant only good news for the flying creatures Due to the strict restrictions, bird studies that require group activities around the world have been stopped and postponed.

According to a study published last year in the journal science, birds are disappearing at an alarming rate in the United States and Canada.

Since 1970, a 29% population drop has been noted and a net loss of about 2.9 billion birds.