ugc_banner

Nepal's general election likely to deliver hung parliament

Kathmandu, NepalWritten By: Saloni MurarkaUpdated: Dec 04, 2022, 06:55 PM IST
main img
Both ruling and the opposition alliances have claimed they would secure a majority in the parliament to form a government. Photograph:(WION)

Story highlights

Nepal Congress (NC) has emerged as the largest party from the November 20 elections while the CPN-UML party is in the second position.
 

The result of Nepal's general election should be finalised in another week, but according to the current result, it is clear no political party or alliance will win a majority of seats in the 275-member House of Representatives.

The counting of votes cast under the Proportional Representation (PR) electoral system is closer to an end and the opposition CPN-UML party led by former prime minister KP Sharma Oli has garnered the most seats under the system.

Meanwhile, under the First Past the Post (FPTP) electoral system, the Election Commission has announced the results of 164 constituencies out of 165.

Nepal Congress (NC) has emerged as the largest party from the November 20 elections while the CPN-UML party is in the second position.

ALSO READ | Nepal Elections 2022: Nepali Congress has an edge over CPN-UML in race to form government

The CPN (Maoist Centre) has maintained a distant third position.

With the rise of the smaller and newly formed party, Rashtriya Swatantra Party (RSP) is set to emerge as the fourth largest party.

The ruling alliance comprising of Nepali Congress, CPN (Maoist Center), CPN (Unified Socialist), Loktantrik Samajbadi Party and People’s Front Nepal appears short of seats to secure the requisite 138 of the total 275 seats in the House of Representatives (HoR).

They will most likely have to reach out to the parties like the RSP, Ratriya Prajantantra Party, fringe Madhes-based parties and independent candidates.

Both ruling and the opposition alliances have claimed they would secure a majority in the parliament to form a government.

Experts highlight the importance of this election for Nepal but are certain the nation is set for a hung parliament.

"We are still not quite sure if this election will bring the political stability for which the public has been longing. The election results show it is not going to be a stable government. It will be a hung parliament as none of the parties have secured a majority. There is going to be a coalition government but it is not sure if pre-poll alliances will continue," Chandra Dev Bhatta a political analyst told WION.

"The Maoist Centre has become slightly weaker than earlier and bargaining capacity has gone down. Nepali Congress has got an upper hand to form a government with like-minded coalition partners. There are rumors that Nepali Congress and CPN-UML will come together," he added.

As the final results are yet to be released, candidates from both the ruling and opposition are eyeing the prime ministerial positions.

Political leaders from different parties have begun to hold dialogues with other leaders in order to form a government.

Within the Nepali Congress, not only Sher Bahadur Deuba but also other senior party leaders Ram Chandra Poudel and youth leader Gagan Kumar Thapa have staked their claim to the post.

However, in the opposition party CPN-UML, the party’s chair, Oli, is the undisputed candidate for Prime Minister. 

Opposition leader Oli held a telephone conversation with CPN-Maoist party chair Pushpa Kamal Dahal 'Prachanda' who is now part of the ruling coalition to form a left-united coalition.

The possibility of ruling Nepali Congress and opposition CPN-UML cannot be ruled out either.

Once the EC announces the election results, the largest party will hold the election of its parliamentary party leader. The winner will be eligible to become the party’s prime ministerial candidate.

It is hard to predict how the power-sharing deal pans out in the coming days.

WATCH WION LIVE HERE

You can now write for wionews.com and be a part of the community. Share your stories and opinions with us here.