Russia: 39,000-year-old cave bear's remains found intact in Siberia

WION Web Team Siberia, Russia Sep 13, 2020, 12.49 PM(IST)

Cave bear Photograph:( Twitter )

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The researchers at NEFU are leading the research of bringing back the extinct species of woolly mammoths and rhinos

In what can be described as a miraculous discovery, Russian scientists have discovered a 39,000-year-old perfectly preserved cave bear and cub in Siberia.

Cave bears were prehistoric species or subspecies that lived in Eurasia from around 300,000 to 15,000 years ago. Up until now, only bones had been found of the bears.

However, now, the cave bear's remains that have been found has all its internal organs intact. Earlier, only bones and skull were found. The photographs also show the bear's nose and teeth are intact.

The discovery has been applauded by the experts and is being considered as a huge step towards Russian scientists' mission of rediscovering and bringing back the extinct species of the Ice Age.

"Today this is the first and only find of its kind — a whole bear carcass with soft tissues," Scientist Dr Lena Grigorieva told the media.

The remains, which were found by reindeer herders on a remote island, will be analysed by expert scientists at the Russia's North-Eastern Federal University (NEFU) in Yakutsk. The researchers at NEFU are leading the research of bringing back the extinct species of woolly mammoths and rhinos.

Scietists from all over the world will be invited to take part in this research, with NEFu holding the lead role. "It is necessary to carry out radiocarbon analysis to determine the precise age of the bear," said Dr Maxim Cheprasov, senior researcher, candidate of biological sciences at the Mammoth Museum laboratory in Yakutsk.

The city of Yakutsk is believed to be the coldest city in the world.

Researchers will be releasing more investigation about this remarkable discovery soon.