NASA catches glimpse of Sun emitting mid-level solar flare. Will it harm us?

WION Web Team
New York Updated: Jan 21, 2022, 05:33 PM(IST)

A picture of the Sun emitting a mid-level solar flare has been taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Photograph:( Twitter )

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The NASA, which has classified this flare as an M5.5 class one, has said that it has an X-ray flare of moderate severity. Although the harmful radiation of a flare can't pass through Earth's atmosphere to affect life on the planet, it can impact electric power grids, navigation signals, radio communications, when it is highly intense. It also poses risk to spacecraft and astronauts

An image of the Sun emitting a mid-level solar flare has been taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on Thursday.   

It had peaked at 1.01 am EST (11.31am IST). The powerful bursts of electromagnetic radiation, which are called solar flares, could last from minutes to hours.   

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The NASA, which has classified this flare as an M5.5 class one, has said that it has an X-ray flare of moderate severity. 

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“The Sun emitted a mid-level solar flare on January 20, 2022, peaking at 1:01 am EST," the US space agency said.  

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Although the harmful radiation of a flare can't pass through Earth's atmosphere to affect life on the planet, it can impact electric power grids, navigation signals, radio communications, when it is highly intense. It also poses risk to spacecraft and astronauts.  

On website, Space Weather Prediction Center of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said, “Solar flares usually take place in active regions, which are areas on the Sun marked by the presence of strong magnetic fields; typically associated with sunspot groups. As these magnetic fields evolve, they can reach a point of instability and release energy in a variety of forms. These include electromagnetic radiation, which are observed as solar flares.”  

(With inputs from agencies) 

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