Fatigue, PTSD, depression and more: Here's how to fight post-Covid problems

Reported By: Wion Web Desk WION Web Team
New Delhi Published: Jun 09, 2021, 03:33 PM(IST)

File photo. Photograph:( DNA )

Story highlights

Almost one in three people hospitalised with SARS or MERS went on to develop PTSD. Also, rates of depression and anxiety were high, at roughly 15 per cent one year

People taken ill by the deadly coronavirus infection may experience fatigue and weakness even after they recover. In a bid to help people get rid of the post-covid symptoms, nutritionist and fitness expert Munmun Ganeriwal recently took to social media to share some tips. She urged people to eat well, exercise regularly, and move often. 

"Those who are experiencing mood changes, brain fog, poor sleep, anxiety or depression post-covid, do NOT panic. Know that it is normal. Most important, do remind yourself that RECOVERY TAKES TIME", Munmun wrote on her social media. 

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The fitness expert urged people to practice 'yoga Nidra' at bedtime. She emphasised the need of meditating every day. As per the nutritionist, avoiding smoking and alcohol will help the patients in minimising brain inflammation. 

A research published in the Lancet Psychiatry journal claimed that people with coronavirus infection may experience mental health issues such as delirium and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), while being hospitalised and potentially even after they recover.

As a part of the research, 65 peer-reviewed studies and seven recent pre-prints that are awaiting peer review were analysed. These studies included data from over 3,500 people who have had one of the three related illnesses. 

Almost one in three people hospitalised with SARS or MERS went on to develop PTSD. Also, rates of depression and anxiety were high, at roughly 15 per cent one year. Sometimes, they were long after the illness, with a further 15 per cent experiencing some symptoms of depression and anxiety without a clinical diagnosis. The study revealed that over 15 per cent infected also experienced chronic fatigue, mood swings, sleep disorder or impaired concentration and memory.

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