No power in the world can touch even an inch of India's land: Rajnath Singh in Ladakh

WION Web Team
New Delhi, Delhi, India Published: Jul 17, 2020, 01:56 PM(IST)

Rajnath Singh in Leh Photograph:( Twitter )

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Rajnath Singh arrived in Leh on Friday on a day-long visit to carry out a comprehensive review of the security scenario in the region in wake of the border row with China.

India is not a weak country and no power in the world can touch even an inch of its land, Defence Minister Rajnath Singh said on Friday as he visited Ladakh to carry out a comprehensive review of the security scenario in the wake of the border standoff with China.

His trip comes days after Prime Minister Narendra Modi's surprise visit to Ladakh on July 3 during which he also addressed troops and signalled the country's firmness in dealing with the India-China border row.

"Talks are underway to resolve the border dispute but to what extent it can be resolved I cannot guarantee. I can assure you -- not one inch of our land can be taken by any power in the world," he said, adding, "if a solution can be found by talks, there is nothing better."

"We will not allow the sacrifice of soldiers to go in vain," Singh said in an apparent reference to the killing of 20 Indian Army personnel during the Galwan Valley clashes with Chinese troops on June 15.

Chief of Defence Staff Gen Bipin Rawat and Army chief Gen M M Naravane are accompanying Singh on the visit.

Also read | Defence Minister Rajnath Singh arrives in Leh to carry out security review

Earlier today, the defence minister witnessed para dropping and scoping weapons at Stankna near Leh. He also inspected a Pika machine gun.

Singh was originally scheduled to visit Ladakh on July 3 but the trip was deferred.

Indian and Chinese troops were locked in a bitter standoff in multiple locations in eastern Ladakh for over eight weeks since May 5. The tension escalated manifold after the violent clashes in Galwan Valley in which 20 Indian Army personnel were killed.

However, following a series of diplomatic and military talks, the two sides began a mutual disengagement process on July 6 and withdrew troops from most of the friction points.

(with inputs from agencies)

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