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Brad Pitt asks NASA scientist about India's Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram

Brad Pitt speaks to ISS astronaut. Photograph:( Reuters )

WION Web Team New Delhi Sep 17, 2019, 06.36 PM (IST)

As Hollywood star Brad Pitt gears for the release of his space film ‘Ad Astra’ in India on September 20, he proved how briefed he is about world developments.

In an interview that has taken social media by storm, Pitt rang up the International Space Station (ISS) and had a list of questions for NASA astronaut Nick Hague. One that stood out was his query of Hague’s stance on India’s Chandrayaan-2 Moon mission among other things.

He also questioned Hague of life in zero gravity conditions and most importantly, if he had done a better job than George Clooney as a cosmonaut.

While the interview played out, the ISS crew previewed his film that has garnered a great review from all around the world. It will be his film after much-talked-about Quentin Tarantino’s film ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood'.

When Pitt started his question-answer round, Hague was heard replying, "Hey Brad, this is Nick. I've got you loud and clear. Welcome to the International Space Station."

Pitt started the conversation with a question on India's Chandrayaan-2 lander Vikram, as part of the country's moon mission. India's space agency ISRO was unsuccessful in its attempt to land the Vikram module on the Moon's south pole.

Pitt asked Hague: "I got to go to JPL last week and it was on the day when India was landing on the moon and the United States were assisting them in that effort. Could you see that from where you are?" 

To this Hague replied, "No, unfortunately, I along with the rest of the crew had to follow along with the news reports.”

Then the US astronaut reflected on the importance of international cooperation in space missions like these. He said, "Things that should be easy, when you try to do them in space they just get harder. The things that we try to do everyday, the team on the ground, NASA and its international partners do a great job of making really hard almost impossible things look routine. It's one of those you can get some complacency. The things that we were able to achieve together is something special.”

"For me that the biggest thing that I have pulled from this mission the idea of cooperation at a global scale is what is going to propel humanity into the future," he added.

Story highlights

As Hollywood star Brad Pitt gears for the release of his space film ‘Ad Astra’ in India on September 20, he proved how briefed he is about the world developments.