Vaccine advocates offer rides to teens to inoculation site, spark controversy

WION Web Team
Ottawa Published: Dec 05, 2021, 02:35 PM(IST)

Representative image Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

After offering a ride to teens, whose parents are against inoculation, to site, vaccine advocates in Canada seem to have sparked a row. Along with facing backlash, the people, who support vaccination, are reportedly receiving threats

After offering a ride to teens, whose parents are against inoculation, to site, vaccine advocates in Canada seem to have sparked a row.   

Along with facing backlash, the people, who support vaccination, are reportedly receiving threats.  

On Friday, the controversy began when a community organiser in Saskatchewan named Julian Wotherspoon, in a Twitter message, offered to help any 13- to 17-year-olds, who want to get inoculated despite opposition from parents.   

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“I’m your ride to the clinic. If anyone asks, I’m taking you and my kids to a movie. Let’s do this,” she said.  

As per the Health Authority of Saskatchewan, children aged 13 and older, “who are able to understand the benefits and possible reactions” of a vaccine, do not need parent’s permission to get inoculated.   

The teens can also refuse inoculation by giving “mature minor” consent to health provider.  

The tweet of Wotherspoon has caused stir as it attracted both praise and outrage. Since then, she has made her account private.  

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A “mommy blogger”, Tenille Lafontaine, called the offer “amazing.” Lafontaine, who also belongs to Saskatchewan, said, “I’ve heard of a few teens getting the vaccine on their own because their parents are insane in the membrane. The kids are gonna be alright. Side note: I’m available to drive anytime.”  

“We don’t want to ever give the perception we’re giving Covid vaccine behind parents’ backs,” Health Minister Paul Merriman told CBC News.  

(With inputs from agencies) 

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