Submersible reaches to deepest known shipwreck

WION Web Team
New Delhi, Delhi, India Published: Apr 02, 2021, 10.48 PM(IST)

Submersible reaches to deepest known shipwreck (Courtesy: Victor Vescovo/ Caladan Oceanic) Photograph:( Others )

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Earlier, the submersible has explored the deepest point in the ocean, Mariana Trench, and the Titanic

A vessel has reached the deepest known shipwreck in the world in the Pacific Ocean.

It was able to find the USS Johnston, which lies 6.5 km (4 miles) beneath the Philippine Sea, reports BBC. 

Explorers surveyed and filmed the wreck of the 115 metre-long US Navy vessel for hours. 

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The vessel sank during a brutal battle with the Japanese fleet during the Battle off Samar in 1944.  

"The wreck is so deep so there's very little oxygen down there, and while there is a little bit of contamination from marine life, it's remarkably well intact except for the damage it took from the furious fight," Victor Vescovo, who led the expedition said. 

In 2019, for the first time, the remains of the ship were found and some parts were recorded from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV).

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However, a significant part of the wreckage was based deeper than where ROV was able to reach. 

For this mission, a submersible called the DSV Limiting Factor was used. 

Earlier, the submersible has explored the deepest point in the ocean, Mariana Trench, and the Titanic. 

Vescovo also said that the hull number 557 can be clearly seen on both sides of the vessel's bow and two gun turrets were also intact. 

"The gun turrets are right where they're supposed to be, they're even pointing in the correct direction that we believe that they should have been, as they were continuing to fire until the ship went down," he said. 

"And we saw the twin torpedo racks in the middle of the ship that were completely empty because they shot all the torpedoes at the Japanese."
 

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