'Design flaw' in Boeing? 737 MAX aircraft wiring under lens

Source: WION Web Team
Place: Washington Published: Jan 06, 2020, 12.10 PM(IST)

File photo: Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, US. Photograph:( Reuters )

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Boeing 737 MAX aircraft has been grounded since March last year. The crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia within five months had killed 346 people leading to the worldwide grounding of the aircraft.

Boeing revealed on Sunday that it was reviewing a wiring issue which could have led to cause a short circuit of the 737 MAX aircraft.

"Identified this issue as part of that rigorous process, and we are working with the FAA to perform the appropriate analysis. It would be premature to speculate as to whether this analysis will lead to any design changes," Boeing's spokesman Gordon Johndroe said.

According to the New York Times, the beleaguered US aircraft company was looking into whether the wiring was bundled too close to each other.

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said the agency and company was "analysing certain findings from a recent review of the proposed modifications to the Boeing 737 MAX."

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The Boeing 737 MAX aircraft has been grounded since March last year. The crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia within five months had killed 346 people leading to the worldwide grounding of the aircraft. In September, Boeing had cut production of the 737 MAX from 52 to 42 per month due to the grounding.

The aircraft company has since replaced Muilenburg and appointed David Calhoun, 62, as the CEO to repair the damage to the company. Boeing temporarily halted production of its grounded 737 Max for the first time in more than 20 years although it said it won't be laying off employees during the production freeze.

The production setback has already cost the company over $9 billion so far.

Boeing had said earlier that dozens of 737NG planes, the successor aircraft of 737 MAX were grounded as a result of the MAX crashes. Australian national carrier Qantas had said that it had found cracks in at least three 737NGs.

In July, Boeing had reported second-quarter loss of $2.9 billion as revenues tumbled 35.1 per cent to $15.8 billion amid the grounding of the aircraft.

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