Major commercial plane crash deaths down over 50% in 2019: Study

WION Web Team New Delhi, Delhi, India Jan 02, 2020, 11.53 AM(IST)

File photo: Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, US. Photograph:( Reuters )

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The Dutch research included crew members, flight attendants, passengers among those killed along with people who were killed on the ground.

According to a Dutch firm, the number of people killed due to crashes by commercial planes in 2019 fell by over fifty per cent despite Boeing 737 MAX crash in Ethiopia. 

Dutch aviation consulting firm To70 said that there were eighty-six accidents which involved large commerical planes in 2019 which resulted in 257 people being killed. It said that there were eight fatal accidents last year. The study found in 2018, 160 accidents occurred with 13 described as being fatal in which 534 people were reportedly killed. 

A Boeing Lion Air 737 MAX airliner had crashed in Indonesia in October killing all 189 people on board. Indonesian investigators in a report said the crash occurred due to design flaws in the software.

The Dutch research included crew members, flight attendants, passengers among those killed along with people who were killed on the ground.

In March, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 plane crashed with  157 people on board. Ethiopian Airlines grounded its Boeing Co 737 MAX 8 fleet after the devastating crash which was followed by China and several other countries.

As a result of the crashes, Boeing temporarily halted production of its grounded 737 Max for the first time in more than 20 years.

In October, Boeing CEO Muilenburg stepped down amid the crashes as the company appointed David Calhoun as the new CEO. Calhoun will take over the duties of CEO and the President from January 13, 2020. The company fired Kevin McAllister, a top executive linked to the MAX air disaster.

The company named veteran executive Stan Deal to the top job at commercial planes. 

Boeing's profits fell in the third quarter after the crashes as the company cut production of its flagship Dreamliner and delayed the arrival of a successor to its 777 mini-jumbo.