In a first, injectable medication for prevention from HIV gets FDA nod in US

WION Web Team
New York Published: Dec 21, 2021, 07:18 PM(IST)

An injectable medication has been approved for prevention against HIV by the Food and Drug Administration. This drug has been made by ViiV Healthcare, which is majority owned by GlaxoSmithKline (representative image).  Photograph:( Reuters )

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The fight against the HIV has been raging around the world for quite some time. As a huge respite, an injectable medication has been approved for prevention against HIV by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States. It is the first long-acting drug for use as pre-exposure prevention or PrEP. The name of the new drug is Apretude

The fight against the HIV has been raging around the world for quite some time. As a huge respite, an injectable medication has been approved for prevention against HIV by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States. 

It is the first long-acting drug for use as pre-exposure prevention or PrEP, the agency announced on Monday.   

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The name of the new drug is Apretude. It can be injected after every two months. The medicine is an alternative to prevention pills for HIV, such as Truvada and Descovy. These pills reduce the risk of HIV by 99% if taken daily.  

Analysing the safety and efficacy of the drug, two trials by FDA found that Apretude fared better in reducing chances of contracting HIV than the oral medications, which are taken daily.  

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In a statement, Dr Debra Birnkrant, director, antivirals division, FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said, “Today’s approval adds an important tool in the effort to end the HIV epidemic by providing the first option to prevent HIV that does not involve taking a daily pill.”   

This medication has been made by ViiV Healthcare, which is majority owned by GlaxoSmithKline. “This injection, given every two months, will be critical to addressing the HIV epidemic in the US, including helping high-risk individuals and certain groups where adherence to daily medication has been a major challenge or not a realistic option,” added Birnkrant.  

(With inputs from agencies) 

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