Covid cases in Europe up again after 10 weeks of decline, says WHO

WION Web Team
New Delhi Published: Jul 01, 2021, 03:21 PM(IST)

Coronavirus in European nations Photograph:( AFP )

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WHO's regional director for Europe Hans Kluge, in a press conference, said, "Last week, the number of cases rose by 10 per cent, driven by increased mixing, travel, gatherings and easing of social restrictions".

The World Health Organization on Thursday said that over two months of declining Covid cases in Europe had come to an end, warning a new wave would come "unless we remain disciplined."

WHO's regional director for Europe Hans Kluge, in a press conference, said, "Last week, the number of cases rose by 10 per cent, driven by increased mixing, travel, gatherings and easing of social restrictions".

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Kluge further said that if people decide to travel and gather, they should assess the risks carefully and do it safely, keeping all life-saving reflexes of masks and self-protections especially indoor and in crowd.

Also Read | Scientists urge UK to expand official list of symptoms for Covid-19

"We see many countries doing well, but the truth is that the average vaccine coverage in the region is 24% only, and more serious, half of our elders and 40% of our health care workers are still unprotected", Kluge said.

He further highlighted that the vaccine is 'effective' against the Delta variant. Urging people to get vaccinated, he said that a delay may cost lives and the economy.

Meanwhile, scientists have urged the UK to expand its official list of Covid symptoms to reduce the number of missed cases.

This will also help in people knowing if they should self-isolate. 

Prof Calum Semple, a member of the government’s Sage committee of experts argues that the 'narrow' clinical definition of covid in the UK leads to delays in identifying people with the disease. 

Semple, of the University of Liverpool, along with Dr Alex Crozier at UCL and others describe how Covid patients do not always experience the official UK symptoms of a high fever, a new continuous cough, or a loss of sense of smell or taste early on, or at any time in the course of the disease.

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