Australian researchers discover ancient underwater archaeological sites

WION Web Team Sydney, Australia Jul 05, 2020, 06.07 PM(IST)

Underwater archaeological sites in Australia Photograph:( Reuters )

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Archaeologists discovered hundreds of stone tools made by aboriginal people when the seabed was dry, at two ancient sites now submerged in the Dampier Archipelago.

Researchers in Australia have discovered the country's first underwater archaeological sites off its west coast dating to more than 7,000 years ago. They say the sites will help with the understanding of the cultural and technology development of its first peoples.

Archaeologists discovered hundreds of stone tools made by aboriginal people when the seabed was dry, at two ancient sites now submerged in the Dampier Archipelago.

While the region is well known for its rich ancient history and its rock-art carvings, the two sites are the first confirmed underwater locations holding evidence of human civilisation on Australia’s continental shelf.

Divers from Flinders University plunge into the water on the Pilbara Coast to retrieve the aboriginal objects from what was once dry land, at a depth of between 2.4 metres and 11 metres (8-36 feet).

They have found cutting and grinding tools and hammer stones that date back thousands of years.

Data from the find is being analysed for precise dating, however radiocarbon dating and analysis of sea-level changes show the site is at least 7,000 years old.