As nations ease coronavirus restrictions, is it a risky gamble?

WION
New Delhi Published: May 11, 2020, 08.36 PM(IST)

Coronavirus in China Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

Switzerland has given a go-ahead to most businesses. Restaurants are allowed to host guests and waiters need not wear masks. Vietnam too is lifting coronavirus curbs

Countries around the world have eased lockdown restrictions. They are all looking at reopening their economies amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In France, people can now leave their homes without paperwork. They can return to work. Businesses have been allowed to re-open. Social distancing, however, is non-negotiable and a mask is a must.

Also Read: United States reports 776 deaths in last 24 hours

There is a fine of 135 euros, if found without one in France. Preschools and elementary schools have been given the green light. In Switzerland, some parents are wary of sending their children to school.

Switzerland has given a go-ahead to most businesses. Restaurants are allowed to host guests and waiters need not wear masks. Vietnam too is lifting coronavirus curbs.

Kindergartens and primary schools have been reopened. Authorities have tweaked the curriculum to keep up with the times.

However, Vietnam is yet to give permission to dance clubs and karaoke bars to reopen. As countries re-open, they are experimenting with various approaches. Spain, for example, has adopted a four-step easing plan. In Canary and Balearic islands, bars, restaurants and shops have re-opened due to a drop in cases.

Museums and gyms too have received a go-ahead but Madrid and Barcelona did not meet the government's criteria for easing measures. As the week progresses, more countries are expected to ease restrictions.

New Zealand will allow malls, cinemas and gyms to reopen from May 14. In Australia's New South Wales, residents will be allowed to host as many as five visitors starting May 15. Cafe and restaurants too will be allowed to serve 10 people at a time but how wise is it to ease restrictions?

Does it not risk the spread of infection? The US is a perfect example to answer this question. Several American states have reopened. There are people on the beaches in Maryland. Experts on the other hand, are revising death toll estimates.

The University of Washington predicts that the US could now have as many as 137,184 deaths by August. There is also the risk of a second wave.

So is the worst over? In the absence of a definite answer, easing restrictions may just be a very risky gamble.

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