Amid threat of Omicron wave, Americans rush to get COVID-19 boosters

WION Web Team
Washington Published: Dec 17, 2021, 03:39 PM(IST)

A nurse prepares a vaccine dose in Los Angeles, California  Photograph:( AFP )

Story highlights

As Christmas approaches, President Biden said the virus could spread more rapidly with the US reporting an average of 86,000 COVID-19 cases since December.

Reports claim there has been a rush for booster doses in Ameican amid warning of an Omicron wave.

US President Joe Biden had warned about "winter of severe illness and death" due to the rise in Omicron cases. The White House had also insisted on booster doses as COVID-19 cases continue to rise.

Also Read: Scientists identify 'scratchy throat' as a common symptom of highly transmissible Omicron variant

As Christmas approaches, President Biden said the virus could spread more rapidly with the US reporting an average of 86,000 COVID-19 cases since December.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the US has been recording 1,150 COVID-19 deaths per day. The total number of deaths due to the pandemic in the United has over 803,000 deaths and 50 million cases as reports claim over 450,000 people have died this year due to the virus.

Watch: UK reports highest COVID-19 spike in a day since January

Alarmed by the rise in Omicron cases, G-7 nations called international cooperation as the EU imposed new travel restrictions.

Reports claim US universities have reverted to online classes with the National Football League(NFL) league also imposing new restrictions with several players testing positive for the virus as coaches, staff and players have been asked to wear masks and conduct team meetings either outside or remotely.

Also Read: EU drug regulator gives go-ahead for Pfizer Covid pill's emergency use

The WHO had warned earlier that the Omicron variant has been spreading an unprecedented rate.

WHO expert Bruce Aylward had said that it would be a "dangerous situation" to categorise the new variant as a "mild disease".

(With inputs from Agencies)

Read in App