After Brexit, demand for Welsh independence surges

Edited By: Gravitas desk WION
New Delhi, India Published: Mar 11, 2021, 11:05 PM(IST)

UK PM Boris Johnson Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

As per the latest poll, approximately 40 per cent of the Welsh people are in favour of parting from Britain due to the difference in social attitudes as a whole and Prime Minister Boris Johnson's coronavirus response

The demand for Welsh independence has witnessed a record surge, according to a new survey.

The Welsh independence campaigners can use the Brexit transition period as an outline for breaking away from the United Kingdom.

As per the latest poll, approximately 40 per cent of the Welsh people are in favour of parting from Britain due to the difference in social attitudes as a whole, and Prime Minister Boris Johnson's coronavirus response.

It comes after Wales' First Minister Mark Drakeford said, "For the first time since devolution, we are dealing with a UK government which is aggressively unilateral".

Almost a quarter of a century back, Wales had voted in favour of devolution or greater powers from the British government.

But now, the political movement for independence is gathering steam.

One of the groups that wants an independent Wales has seen a big spike in membership. In the last 12 months, it has grown from less than 4,000 members to nearly 18,000.

The growing support for independence is a warning for 10 Downing Street. The British government is already facing a demand for independence from Scotland.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon plans to push for a second referendum if re-elected in May.

With citizens reeling from the cost of Brexit, the pandemic seems to have supercharged the calls for independence.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been criticised for his pandemic response, and the devolution of lockdown policy to the governments of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland has emboldened their populations.

While those in favour of independence are still not in the majority, the support base both in Scotland and Wales is large enough to put the future of the British union at stake.

 

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