'Confusing': Biden takes a dig at reporters on 'explaining' supply chain disruptions

WION Web Team
Washington Published: Nov 07, 2021, 06:21 PM(IST)

US President Joe Biden got confused between 1967 Six-Day War and Yom Kippur War of 1973 (file photo). Photograph:( AFP )

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France and Germany have reportedly experienced loss in industrial output due to persistent supply chain disruptions with the German auto industry taking a major hit.

As supply chain disruptions continue to hit major economies, US President Joe Biden while interacting with reporters said it is a "complicated world" while conceding that it is "confusing" for many people.

Biden told reporters at the White House that they haven't been able to "properly explain the supply chain very well" while adding, "I'm not being critical. I'm being deadly earnest. This is a confusing time".

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"You can understand why people are upset, whether you have a PhD or you're working in a restaurant. It's confusing. People are understandably worried," the US president said.

The supply chain snarls have affected several sectors including computers, cars, clothing, mobile phones and is set to last well into next year, according to experts.

France and Germany have reportedly experienced loss in industrial output due to persistent supply chain disruptions with the German auto industry taking a major hit.

Several factories have been shut as key areas have been hit by lockdowns as production of spare parts and semiconductors have been below pre-pandemic levels for the past several months.

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Arm Holdings chief executive Simon Segars had said recently that supply chain constraints would not be completely fixed in the near term as the world continues to grapple with the virus.

The semiconductor industry has been especially vulnerable as demand for electronic devices has suddenly grown causing shortages since areas where spare parts are located have been under lockdown or have been experiencing shortage of workers.

Apple has also been hit by supply chain bottlenecks even as demand for phones have increased as iPhone and iPad sales have been hampered.

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US Federal Reserve had said last month that supply bottlenecks and labour shortages had slowed the country's economic growth also due to the "uncertainty around the Delta variant of COVID-19".

(With inputs from Agencies)

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