Twitter is working on a three-tier labelling mechanism to fight misinformation. Here's how it'll work

Edited By: Bharat Sharma WION Web Team
New Delhi, India Published: Jun 01, 2021, 03:06 PM(IST)

This photograph taken on October 26, 2020 shows the logo of US social network Twitter displayed on the screen of a smartphone and a tablet in Toulouse, southern France Photograph:( AFP )

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It appears that the three-tier system will have the following labels “Get the latest,” “Stay Informed,” and “Misleading”, with these subject to change as the information is updated

In the post-truth era, misinformation dictates content on social media platforms. Mega-companies like Twitter and Facebook have largely been unable to keep up with the circulation of manipulated information. Now, Twitter will mark user tweets based on the accuracy of information it claims to represent. 

Part of this initiative will include a three-tiered labelling mechanism whereby the veracity of one’s claims will reflect in those labels. The labels are not arbitrary and are expected to change essentially based on how wrong one is.

Application researcher Jane Manchun Wong, who is known for unveiling upcoming features before they go live recently shared a glimpse of how the labelling system will operate.

Based on Wong’s revelations, it appears that the three-tier system will have the following labels “Get the latest,” “Stay Informed,” and “Misleading”, with these subject to change as the information is updated.

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“Get the latest” will basically imply that the information in a particular Tweet appears to be correct and the link will direct the user to further information. “Stay informed” would suggest some sort of factual inconsistency, with a label redirecting people to verified sources or to Twitter’s own resources.

The third label “Misleading” will warn users against misinformation and factually incorrect claims on the website marred with rampant fake news.

Also read: Russia fines Twitter 19 million roubles for failing to delete content

Even then, this brings to fore the question of censorship and whether Twitter can accurately differentiate misinformation from factually correct information. 

It is unclear when the feature will be rolled out and whether it will even see the light of day. But Wong's claims have proven to be right in the recent weeks, with the reintroduction of the verification programme and its Tip Jar feature to assist with content monetisation.

In the recent weeks, social media companies have been accused of stifling pro-Palestine voices amid the fatal conflict with Israel and the role played by social media companies in amplifying and stifling certain narratives is becoming increasingly questionable.

Also read: India slams Twitter's concerns over threat to free speech

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