Invisible 'ghost stars' may be holding galaxies together in space. What does this revelation change?

Edited By: Bharat Sharma WION Web Team
New Delhi, India Published: Mar 26, 2021, 03:06 PM(IST)

(Representative Image) Photograph:( AFP )

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The study claims that galaxies are in fact held together by dark matter, but this dark matter manifests itself in the form of “ghost stars”

Space is the repository of universal secrets, many of which we may never be able to decrypt. Scientists have for long believed that everything in the universe, especially galaxies are held together by an invisible substance called “dark matter”, which has never been visually observed.

Now, new studies posit the unbelievable, that galaxies are in fact held together by dark matter, but this dark matter manifests itself in the form of “ghost stars”, as first claimed by BBC’s Science Focus magazine.

Scientists believe that the stars could have escaped human scrutiny by posing as black holes, and remaining in the shadows. What’s even more interesting is the fact that these somehow stars support the web of universal objects we see in the sky. 

Also read: Hear galaxies and black holes translated into music from NASA data

If true, this would change the game for everything we know about the universe - entirely contingent on the existence of dark matter and consequentially - ghost stars.

Also read: Something is tearing apart star cluster closest to Solar System

The experiments were looking for particles called WIMPS or Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, which many scientists call the leading candidate for actual dark matter. Another candidate is what they’re calling the “dark boson”, and according to the BBC, this boson could be the basic ingredient of dark matter and/or dictate how it interacts with matter visible to us.

Further study of these dark bosons revealed that they were getting piled up to form ghost stars. In the absence of a core at the centre, these stars would emit no light and remain invisible. That's not it! These stars could actually be mistaken for supermassive black holes by scientists.

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