At UNHRC, India highlights Pakistan providing 'pensions' to terrorists

Written By: Sidhant Sibal WION
New Delhi Published: Mar 02, 2021, 04:58 PM(IST)

Indian diplomat at the Indian mission in UN, Geneva Pawan Badhe (Picture Credit: MEA) Photograph:( Others )

Story highlights

Pakistan approached United Nations Security Council for 'basic expense' for 26/11 mastermind Hafiz Saeed, Lakshar-e-Taiba's leader Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi and Mahmood Sultan Bashiruddin, a Pakistani nuclear engineer

At the United Nations Human Rights Council, India has highlighted Pakistan is providing pensions to United Nations-listed terrorists even as New Delhi expressed concerns over Islamabad's continued support to cross border terror. 

Indian diplomat at the Indian mission in UN, Geneva Pawan Badhe said, "The members of this Council are well aware that Pakistan has provided pensions to dreaded and listed terrorists out of state funds and has the dubious distinction of hosting the largest number of terrorists proscribed by the United Nations." 

Pakistan approached United Nations Security Council for 'basic expense' for 26/11 mastermind Hafiz Saeed, Lakshar-e-Taiba's leader Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi and Mahmood Sultan Bashiruddin, a Pakistani nuclear engineer. 

According to the security council resolution concerning its sanctions regime, asset freeze exemptions can be granted for what is called 'basic expenses'. These 'expense' or 'pensions' include provisions, such as payment for foodstuffs, rent or mortgage, medicines and medical treatment, taxes, insurance premiums. The 1267 sanctions regime of UNSC includes three main areas, assets freeze, travel ban, and arms embargo. 

Pawan in India's right of reply after Pakistan raked up Kashmir at the council, pointed out, "Pakistani leaders have admitted the fact that it has become a factory for producing terrorists." 

Adding," Pakistan has ignored that terrorism is the worst form of human rights abuse and the supporters of terrorism are the worst abusers of human rights." 

Pakistani PM Imran Khan has publicly admitted in the past that his country has hosted terror groups and once even called Al Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden as a 'Martyr'. 

The Indian diplomat said, "Pakistan, a country in dire economic situation, will be well advised to ... stop state-sponsored cross-border terrorism and end institutionalised violation of human rights of its minority and other communities." 

Islamabad's track record in protecting its minorities has been criticised several times, with Hindus, Sikhs and Christians facing regular discrimination. 

"Council should ask Pakistan", Pawan said, "Why the size of its minority communities, such as Christians, Hindus and Sikhs has drastically shrunk since independence" and "why they and other communities, such as Ahmadiyyas, Shias, Pashtuns, Sindhis and Baloch, have been subjected to draconian blasphemy laws, systemic persecution, blatant abuses and forced conversions." 

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