Joe Biden aims to vaccinate 70% of world population within a year: Reports

WION Web Team
Washington, United States Published: Sep 15, 2021, 08:49 PM(IST)

US President Joe Biden Photograph:( AFP )

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As per the White House, led by Biden, this target of vaccinating 70 per cent of the world’s population 'is ambitious but consistent with existing targets'

US President Joe Biden is set to propose a target of vaccinating nearly 70 per cent of world’s population within next year.

Biden will reportedly make an announcement at a global vaccines summit that he is planning to attend soon. His ambition will be in line with World Bank’s target which are in partnership with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the WTO and the World Health Organization (WHO).

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As per the White House, led by Biden, this target of vaccinating 70 per cent of the world’s population "is ambitious but consistent with existing targets".

His new target has come a little after the chiefs of World Bank, IMF, WTO and WHO decided that the world leaders will come together to vaccinate at least 60 per cent of the world’s population by middle of 2022.

Biden will also urge other wealthy countries to purchase or donate at least one billion additional doses of coronavirus vaccines, in addition to the already pledged two billion vaccines. The world leaders have also been requested to donate $3bn (£2.2bn) in 2021 and  $7bn in 2022 for financing "for vaccine readiness and administration, combating hesitancy, and procuring ancillary supplies".

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The WHO, meanwhile, reported that this month only 20 per cent of people in low and lower-middle income countries have received the first dose of coronavirus vaccine. This figure shows a drastic contrast with the developed and wealthy nations where nearly 80 per cent people were vaccinated.

Experts of the WHO have assured that they are still trying to protect the vulnerable people in the world as it "continues to be hampered by export bans, the prioritisation of bilateral deals by manufacturers and countries, ongoing challenges in scaling up production by some key producers, and delays in filing for regulatory approval".

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