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Supreme Court begins hearing P Chidambaram’s plea

File photo of P Chidambaram. Photograph:( Reuters )

WION Web Team New Delhi Aug 21, 2019, 10.24 AM (IST)

Supreme Court on Wednesday began hearing the plea filed by former finance minister P Chidambaram.

Chidambaram's lawyer Arshdeep Singh Khurana had earlier responded to CBI's notice that was put outside the former finance minister's residence and sought his appearance before them in "two hours"

In a letter to CBI, lawyer Arshdeep Singh Khurana said, "I am instructed to state that your notice fails to mention the provision of law under which my client has been issued a notice to appear within 2 hours."

He further said that the Supreme Court has permitted his counsel to mention the urgent Special Leave Petition against the order before 10:30 am on Wednesday.

Further requesting the authorities to not to take any "coercive action" against the former finance minister and wait for the hearing till 10:30 am, Khurana said, "He has been permitted by Supreme Court to mention the urgent Special Leave Petition against the order before Court at 10:30 am today. I, therefore, request you not to take any coercive action against my client till then and await the hearing at 10:30 am.

He also added, "Furthermore, my client is exercising the rights available to him in law and  had approached the Supreme Court on August 20 seeking urgent reliefs in respect of the order dismissing his anticipatory bail (in INX media case)."

The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) had put up a notice outside the residence of former Finance Minister and senior Congress leader P Chidambaram on Tuesday asking him to appear before them in the next two hours.

Earlier, the Delhi High Court had dismissed Chidambaram`s both anticipatory bail pleas in connection with INX Media case. 

Story highlights

In a letter to CBI, lawyer Arshdeep Singh Khurana said, 'I am instructed to state that your notice fails to mention the provision of law under which my client has been issued a notice to appear within 2 hours'