Scientists label 'morbidly curious' horror fans the calmest in a post-pandemic world!

WION Web Team New Delhi, India Jul 07, 2020, 06.05 PM(IST) Edited By: Bharat Sharma

Revellers pose for pictures during the annual' Zombie' walk, infuenced by horror movies, during the carnival season in Athens on February 10, 2018 Photograph:( AFP )

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A new study has claimed that ardent fans of the horror genre were better prepared to deal with the fallout of the pandemic

All those sleepless nights after binge watching the SAW series or Paranormal Activity may indeed have been worth it!

A new study has claimed that ardent fans of the horror genre were better prepared to deal with the fallout of the pandemic, and found it easier to acclimatise to a post-pandemic lifestyle.

Psychologically less affected

When a team of psychologists set out to identify a group which could help carve out a blueprint on how to deal with a pandemic without ringing alarm bells, their conclusions surprised them. Long-term fans of horror films and shows coped most easily with the harrowing effects of COVID-19 pandemic.

The pandemic has changed our cultural and social lives, making it difficult for one to adjust to reconfiguring our lifestyle to centre around “sanitisation” and “prevention”.

The New Scientist report, based on a study undertaken by psychologists, claims that the “morbidly curious” aka horror fans were psychologically less affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Revellers pose for pictures during the annual' Zombie' walk, infuenced by horror movies, during the carnival season in Athens on February 10, 2018
Revellers pose for pictures during the annual' Zombie' walk, infuenced by horror movies, during the carnival season in Athens on February 10, 2018 | AFP

Published online in the last week of June, the study asserts how those who revel in jump scares and eerie sound effects were not just better prepared to deal with extreme calamities, but also to have a positive outlook in the aftermath of such events.

What is emotion regulation?

A psychologist from the University of Chicago told New Scientist that the behaviour and calmness exhibited by horror fans suggests that horror is about “emotion regulation”. In essence, he is suggesting that horror better equips people to be in control of their emotions and to exercise control over them.

The psychologist, Scrivner further extrapolated how horror films allow one to experience fear, to consequentially overcome it. This may creep into real life experiences of those familiar with the genre, to mould them into being more optimistic whenever stressful situations arise.

Of course, there are many other factors that the study ignored but eventually intends to imbibe after it is peer reviewed and has more scientific value.

Many studies have pointed how coronavirus pandemic has worsened the mental health of many, especially those who suddenly found it difficult to cope with staying inside and to tremendously limit social contact.

Fact or fable, one thing’s for sure: Horror prepares you for the worst!