WHO urges people to delay routine dental work due to virus transmission

WION Web Team
New Delhi, Delhi, India Published: Aug 12, 2020, 11:15 AM(IST)

WHO urges people to delay routine dental work due to virus transmission Photograph:( AFP )

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The United Nations health agency released guidance for dentists on how to minimise the risk of virus transmission during the pandemic. 

World Health Organisation (WHO) on Tuesday said that non-essential dental routine work such as check-ups, dental cleanings and preventive care should be delayed until coronavirus' transmission rate declines. 

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WHO cautioned against the procedures that produce aerosol spray from patients' mouths.

The United Nations health agency released guidance for dentists on how to minimise the risk of virus transmission during the pandemic. 

The guidance read: "WHO advises that routine non-essential oral health care - which usually includes oral health check-ups, dental cleanings and preventive care - be delayed until there has been sufficient reduction in COVID-19 transmission rates from community transmission to cluster cases."

"The same applies to aesthetic dental treatments. However, urgent or emergency oral health care interventions that are vital for preserving a person's oral functioning, managing severe pain or securing quality of life should be provided."

The WHO even urged that if possible, patients should be remotely screened before their appointments.

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WHO released the interim guidance on August 3 was aired on Tuesday. 

According to the health organisation, dentists are at high risk of being infected with COVID-19. 

"Oral health care teams work in close proximity to patients' faces for prolonged periods," the organisation said.

"Their procedures involve face-to-face communication and frequent exposure to saliva, blood, and other body fluids and handling sharp instruments. Consequently, they are at high risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 or passing the infection to patients," it added. 

(Inputs from AFP)

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