Research shows England's iconic Stonehenge first appeared in Wales

WION Web Team
World Published: Feb 12, 2021, 03:29 PM(IST)

Stonehenge Photograph:( AFP )

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The mysterious stones at Stonehenge are nearly 13 foot high and seven feet wide, however, scientists still haven't been able to understand exactly why it was built and how it was put there.

According to reports, researchers have found vast stone circles in UK's Wales with diameter closely resembling the iconic Stonehenge.

The researchers have reportedly unearthed several stone holes in west of Wales  and have reportedly also identified quarries which are thousands of years old. Reports say radiocarbon dating show gap of several centuries between the bluestone quarries and those at Stonehenge.

The stone features were reportedly taken from Wales and then resurrected in Wiltshire where it now stands.

The mysterious stones at Stonehenge are nearly 13 foot high and seven feet wide, however, scientists still haven't been able to understand exactly why it was built and how it was put there.

No written records exist on the construction of the British monument which has attracted the interest of researchers worldwide. Now researchers say some stones used at Stonehenge were used in an earlier monument 175 miles (280 kilometres) away in southwest Wales.

University College London (UCL) researchers say the blue and grey stones from Wales may have been moved by the builders of Stonehenge as they migrated. 

The Stonehenge was likely built in 3000 BC, with the earlier stone circle named Waun Mawn with a diameter of 360 feet is one of the oldest stone circles in Britain and the country's third-largest. The researchers have found that the stones at the Welch site was erected nearly 400 years before Stonehenge.

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