Mass cervical cancer vaccine deployment could save over 60 million lives in next 100 years

WION Web Team New Delhi, India Jan 31, 2020, 10.52 PM(IST) Edited By: Sparshita Saxena

Experts suggest around thirds of cancers can be avoided just by preventive measures. Photograph:( DNA )

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It was estimated that a major chunk of new cervical cancer across the globe could be attributed to low and lower-middle-income nations. 

Two latest studies point at the fact that rapid deployment of cervical cancer vaccines can avoid over 70 million cases and nearly 62 million deaths due to cervical cancer in the next 100 years to come. 

As per the report published in 'The Lancet', it was found that vaccination of cervical cancer in girls coupled with cervical cancer screening in women was projected to bring down the incident of cervical cancer by over 90 per cent. 

It was estimated that a major chunk of new cervical cancer across the globe could be attributed to low and lower-middle-income nations. 

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"Approximately 570 000 cases of cervical cancer and 311 000 deaths from the disease occurred in 2018. Cervical cancer was the fourth most common cancer in women, ranking after breast cancer (2·1 million cases), colorectal cancer (0·8 million) and lung cancer (0·7 million)," notes a Lancet report which was published last year.

The report also stated that China and India together "contributed more than a third of the global cervical burden, with 106 000 cases in China and 97 000 cases in India, and 48 000 deaths in China and 60 000 deaths in India". 

Lack of awareness and easy availability of vaccines and invasive treatment add more to the burden of rising cancer cases and related mortality. 

"US$1.16 trillion is the estimated total annual economic cost of cancer in 2010," estimates WHO. 

An estimated 8.8 million died of the disease in 2015 and the number of cases is only rising by the day. 

While nothing guarantees cancer prevention, dietary tweaks and changes in lifestyle can go a long way in minimising the risks.