Convicted on new charges, Suu Kyi gets four-year jail in Myanmar, says report

WION Web Team
Yangon Published: Jan 10, 2022, 10:56 AM(IST)

A junta court in Myanmar convicted Aung San Suu Kyi of three criminal charges on Monday (file photo). Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

Since coup, Myanmar’s junta has been accused of coming up with false charges against ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In the latest round of a legal onslaught, a junta court in Myanmar convicted Suu Kyi of three criminal charges on Monday. She has also been sentenced to four years in jail

Since coup, Myanmar’s junta has been accused of coming up with false charges against ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi.   

In the latest round of a legal onslaught, a junta court in Myanmar convicted Suu Kyi of three criminal charges on Monday, an AFP report said.   

She has also been sentenced to four years in jail.   

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The 76-year-old leader was found guilty of two charges related to illegally importing and owning walkie-talkies and one of breaking rules of coronavirus, a source, who has knowledge of the case told AFP.  

On December 17, Suu Kyi had appeared in court wearing prison clothes. The Nobel laureate was wearing the white top and brown wraparound longyi, which is the uniform for prisoners in the South Asian country as mentioned by Reuters report.   

She was sentenced to two years' detention for incitement against the military and breaching coronavirus rules.   

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Myanmar has been in chaos and since February when Suu Kyi's civilian government was ousted by the military junta. Pro-democracy protests erupted across the country.   

Junta opposed the protests with a brutal crackdown that has left more than 1,300 people dead, hundreds are injured, thousands arrested if reports by according to a local monitor are to be believed. There's no certainty over how the prisoners are being treated.   

(With inputs from agencies) 

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