Why over 6,000 trees were uprooted post Pak PM's 'biggest planting campaign'

WION Web Team New Delhi, Delhi, India Aug 10, 2020, 09.58 PM(IST)

Why over 6,000 trees were uprooted post Pak PM's 'biggest planting campaign' Photograph:( Twitter )

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The video was shared by a former UN environment executive director Erik Solheim

After Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan launched a massive tree-planting programme, a video has gone viral, which has been viewed over 216,000 times, in which a group of people are being shown uprooting trees from a land. 

The video was shared by a former UN environment executive director Erik Solheim, on Twitter saying, "Prime minister Imran Khan of Pakistan this weekend organized massive tree planting. Extremists attacked the great efforts of the prime minister claiming it is against islam. Crazy! All religions call upon us to protect Mother Earth."

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However, he later said that he was informed that the matter was resolved and not related to religion. The tweet also has a video which showed the replanting of the trees. 

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"I am very glad to be informed that the local dispute regarding tree planting in Pakistan has been resolved and that it was not rooted in religion", he later tweeted.

"Let’s come together to support the great tree planting initiative led by prime minister Imran Khan. Let's protect Mother Earth!"

According to Samaa TV, in the video which was from Pakistan's Khyber’s Mandi Kass district, people were uprooting saplings in a way to protest against government's decision to claim of this disputed land. 

The report said that the protesters removed 6,000 plants planted by the government. 

A few days ago, Pakistani PM invited everyone, including chief ministers and other people to join him on what he described as "biggest tree planting campaign" on August 9 to plant over 3.5 million trees in one day.