Taliban urge international airlines to resume flights to Afghanistan

WION Web Team
New Delhi, India Published: Sep 26, 2021, 06:09 PM(IST)

(File photo) Taliban soldiers stand in front of a sign at the international airport in Kabul Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

After the United States' withdrawal of troops from the war-torn country, only a limited number of aid and passenger flights have been operating from the airport

The Taliban government in Afghanistan on Sunday (September 26) urged the international airlines to resume flights to and from Kabul, claiming that all technical issues at the country's main airport have been resolved.  

In a statement, Abdul Qahar Balkhi, the newly appointed spokesman for the ministry of foreign affairs, said the Taliban hoped proper commercial services would resume shortly and promised full cooperation. 

"Many Afghan citizens were stuck outside and unable to return to their homeland. Moreover, many Afghan citizens who have international employment or pursue education abroad are now facing difficulties in reaching their destinations," he said. 

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The statement from the foreign affairs ministry reflects the Taliban's bid to open up the country and gain international acceptance. 

After the United States' withdrawal of troops from the war-torn country, only a limited number of aid and passenger flights have been operating from the airport. 

Charter flights have been operating, although Pakistan International Airlines (PIA), Iran's Mahan Air and Afghanistan's Kam Air have run a limited number of special flights, however, prices have been reported to be many times higher than normal. 

The chaotic evacuation of more than 120,000 people that ended on August 30 with the withdrawal of the last US troops, left the airport damaged. 

The airport has since been reopened with the assistance of technical teams from Qatar and Turkey. 

Since taking power, the Taliban have grappled with a severe economic crisis and have faced pressure on issues ranging from girls' education to allegations of reprisals against former officials and others associated with the previous government.

(With inputs from agencies)

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