Do not miss it! Catch memorable sight of Eta Aquarids meteor shower this weekend  

Edited By: Gandharv Walia
London Updated: May 07, 2022, 11:09 AM(IST)

Catch the glimpse of Eta Aquarids meteor shower this weekend (representative image). Photograph:( Reuters )

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These shooting stars seem to have originated from Halley's Comet (1P/Halley). It is a short-period comet, which comes by every 75 to 76 years. It swings through the inner solar system. When it visits, it leaves behind a trail of dust grains, which Earth clears every May. Some debris, which hits our atmosphere, burn up before reaching us

Meteor showers are usually liked by one and all. This weekend, catch the glimpse of the Eta Aquarids, which is one of the busiest meteor showers.  

For watching the "shooting stars", just step outside and look at the night sky.  

Reaching peak on May 6, the Eta Aquarids will put up a strong show in the coming days. It will reach around 30 meteors an hour, media reports said.   

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These meteors are also known for their speed. They can reach around 148,000 mph (just over 238,000 km/h) when they hit atmosphere, NASA said.  

If you are close to the equator or in the Southern Hemisphere, the meteor shower will be visible clearly. Well, don’t fret if you are elsewhere as you can still see the meteors in the Northern Hemisphere, said Bill Cooke, lead, NASA's Meteoroid Environments Office (MEO) at the agency's Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama.  

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In a NASA post, Cooke said, "It will be interesting to see if the rates are low this year, or if we will get a spike in numbers before next year's forecast outburst."  

These shooting stars seem to have originated from Halley's Comet (1P/Halley). It is a short-period comet, which comes by every 75 to 76 years. It swings through the inner solar system.   

When it visits, it leaves behind a trail of dust grains, which Earth clears every May. Some debris, which hits our atmosphere, burn up before reaching us.   

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(With inputs from agencies) 

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